Naing: August 2017

MONTHLY REPORT

SITUATION

The month of August I faced difficulty upon difficulty. We stayed hospital for a week, and we went to clinic for my wife whose blood is so weak and injection was done; at the same time my daughter Mercy Sen also felt sick and we went to the clinic. I spent time with my family at home for almost 15 days. During 15 days I did all things of house works.

Last month the Government issued Regional Order No. 1/2017 for minority religions, even the country religion Buddhist is free to do what they like. Minor religions was depressed wisely. The Government did not give any permission for registration, she did not give any church building as well.

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Thau: May 2016

Dear leader,

This is my humbly request from God for $26,000. The last years the storm has destroyed our children home. Please pray that God will meet this urgent need for rebuilding. We have 70 children and orphans. Till today we do not have any foreign sponsor .

Please find out  sponsor for us. Thank you for standing for us.

Joseph

Thau: January 2016

We started our mission trip to Rakhine state on 19 December 2015 and it ended on 31 December 2015. I am so excited to tell you all about how God moving in unreached people groups.

1. How to go there: we go to Rakhine state by bus in one day and one night, and then we go to Letu land by boat in one day, and after we walk by foot 2 days. We cross rivers, streams, brooks, hills, mountain passes, and valleys, and preach the salvation of Jesus to village people.

2. How to do outreach: We did seminars in two places. We reached 11 villages, 555 people has heard the good news, and 58 people have been baptized by me.

Campana: January 2013

It’s been a while since I have posted anything for several reasons. I have been dealing with some physical issues that have depleted much of my energy both physically and emotionally. I have been trying to recover and reclaim my health and energy since my return to the U.S. late this past summer. This has been a difficult season for me, making me wonder how I can recover and maintain my health with the schedule and demand that is now on me. I have felt old and tired many times in the last 8 months or so which has been very discouraging and concerning to me. After several cleanses, nutritional, herbal and other natural remedies, I am thankful to be able to say I am feeling a good deal better this last month, although not yet 100%.

Just a quick update to briefly fill in the gap since my last post. I finished up my time in the Philippines at the end of August. My time there was well spent, both from a clinical and personal perspectives. Experiences to learn and also some to teach, as well I met some new friends and midwives that are doing some great work serving those in need.

Currently I am back in SC working with a preceptor at a free-standing birth center. There are 5 midwives and 3 apprentices/interns. So far this has been a good experience and I am learning more about natural remedies including homeopathy. The plan is to finish up my clinical requirements (which I only have 2 more births for that to be complete), then take and pass the board exam this summer.

Most of the births I have attended since Dec. 2012 have been like a wooing to my spirit, reminding me of my love and awe of the birth process. Most of these births have been accompanied by long labors, like 24-48 hours or more (which I do NOT love….). All parties involved have been exhausted to say the least. During those long hours, days and nights I have witnessed some of the most precious intimate moments that serve as reminders for me of the sanctity of it all.

Throughout the years working with laboring women I have heard many women cry out during labor and the birth of their children. Cries of pain, fear, joy, sorrow, loss and what I have previously described as desperation. Recently though, I witnessed and experienced two mothers do something I have never seen or heard before. I guess I would define it as a kind of desperation, however not like any desperation I have ever before witnessed in a birth room. This was absolutely soul penetrating for me to witness, it was powerful and strong.

My preceptor and I had tried everything we knew to do, trying to help these women to rest when labor would wane. We kept them hydrated, got food in them to keep their energy up, tried every position possible to help their babies realign themselves and come down into the birth canal (One of the babies did come down, and then she went back up. If I hadn’t witnessed it myself I would have told you that isn’t even possible, but it did happen…). I watched as their husbands encouraged, held, fed, hydrated, massaged, lifted and carried them.

I do not know if I can accurately express here what I heard and felt as these two mothers cried out for their children. Literally, calling/crying out their child’s name, begging them to be born through tears of pain and suffering, both having been in labor over 36 hours. Tears welled up in my own eyes and my body ached with compassion and empathy for them. Wrought by their agony, my spirit and soul were moved as their voices pierced the night air. I stood in front of both these women, I felt helpless to ease their suffering or bring forth their infants, and I was….

The veil between heaven and this earth becomes so very thin when birth is happening. The air in the rooms become thick and almost tangible, you see evidence of love manifest. A mother must give herself to labor itself, to the pain and misery that is the power of the miracle she is apart of.

Every midwife knows

that not until a mother’s womb
 softens from the pain of labour

will a way unfold
and the infant find that opening to be born.
Oh friend!

There is treasure in your heart,

it is heavy with child.
Listen.

All the awakened ones, 
like trusted midwives are saying,
 ‘welcome this pain.’
It opens the dark passage of Grace.
(Rumi)

Being with women in their most vulnerable state, midwives attend to them and often their partners during one of the most intimate times of their lives. Sometimes, when it all becomes so heavy in the birth room, I want to turn away my eyes because it is overwhelming to be witnessing these moments that belong to other people.

This profession is intense and intrusive both for midwives and the women we serve. It is an honor and a privilege albeit with personal sacrifices being common. Yet, I know this is a part of who I am and who I am called to be.

Campana: February 2012

I am in the Philippines now and have been for almost two weeks. I am near Subic Bay, for those of you who are familiar with the different islands here. I did not suffer any jet lag, which is a first for me and I hope a new trend. Even though this is my first time to the Philippines it feels quite familiar with similarities that only come from having been in SE Asia before. Two things immediately stood out to me that I hadn’t given much thought to before coming here, and that is the amount of English being spoken and written here and that the primary faith expressed here is Christian; mostly Catholic and then Protestant, there is also a fair sized Islamic community as well in the area. I realized this when I didn’t see any buddhist monks and temples, which is has been so common place for me with my previous travels.

The birth home is situated in a small neighborhood and it houses some of the staff midwives as well as the student/interns. Currently there are three of us (students) and prior to my arrival two other students were here as well, all from my class last fall. The house has two bedrooms, one for the staff midwives and one for the interns. There is a common room, kitchen/dining area and 1 bathroom for the staff and interns to share, and to my surprise a washing machine. 

There are two treatment areas, each consisting of two beds. One room is for postpartum and prenatal patients, the other room is the labor/birth room. The common area in the house also serves as the waiting area for mothers and their families. There are two scheduled prenatal days a week, we also do home visits to postpartum patients on the first and third days after birth, then at 1 week, 3 weeks and 6weeks the women come to the clinic to be checked along with their infants. I have been out on several occasions to do home visits since arriving and I have to say I have really enjoyed it. The two home visits the other day consisted of going to the landfill, yes I mean the dump, and the other required several minutes of climbing incredibly steep concrete stairs up the side of a mountain. Transportation to and from the different homes have included walking, taking buses, jeepneys and trycies.

I have observed and assisted several births here so far.  Two of the women have delivered on a birthing stool both, all of the births have been very peaceful and without any complications. One mother came in at 4a.m. and by 4:20a.m. a healthy baby boy was born, with apgar scores of 9 and 9 weighing in at 3kg or 6lbs 6oz. Mom and baby were doing great at both postpartum visits I attended. Oh, and we received a bag of mangos for our services, fAbulous….

It’s been a few years since I have been around laboring and birthing women and their newborns…I’ve missed it. I have also done several prenatal exams and I expect I will do many more, the two prenatal days during the week can be quite busy.

Earlier this week a team from Canada came to do some building projects for Mercy in Action. The have been working on the property and future clinic site which Mercy now owns and is about a 10 minute walk from the current clinic site. They have been helping build small bungalow type huts for women to come down from the mountains to stay in for several days before they are in labor and during their postpartum period after; these will also be available to the women living in the city. The team has also been working around the clinic laying a new vinyl floor in the birth room, making some repairs here and there and thankfully fixed the wifi! With them, they brought some supplies for the clinic. We were all but out of prenatal vitamins and now I believe there is a supply for several months.

I have enjoyed buying my many of my meals on the streets in the neighborhood and especially happy about being able to purchase a green coconut almost daily, having it ‘opened’ and drinking the water,  all for only 15 pesos (about .40 cents)….I have had  some of the best conversations at the local shops on our street, there are some really sweet and funny women in this neighborhood, they are always happy to instruct me on how to eat the different fruits and vegetables here and also to discuss my love life….

I am encouraged to be at this point in my training and looking forward to what it will bring. I hope to have much to write about in the upcoming weeks.

Campana: January 2012

December has come and gone and it has taken along with it the holidays and most of January. I have been back in Washington state since mid December and enjoying getting to see my two sons, daughter-n-law and granddaughter. While here I have been staying with close friends and also at my sons home. I am really thankful to have gotten to spend Christmas with my kids, we were only missing one this year.

Being able to watch my granddaughter experience her first Christmas morning and watching my son and his wife experience it with her, well, that was my favorite gift this season. We spent Christmas Day at my favorite cousins house with much food and more laughter and presents too! I was really surprised and blessed for Christmas, my kids gave me a kit bag for my midwifery supplies along with a nook, complete with accessories and a gift card to build my library, both will come in handy over the coming months.

We have brought in the new year with much cooking and baking and candy making (which is still going on this week) some of these are traditions that go back generations in our family, a blessed season to be sure! I have spent a good amount of time with my daughter-n-law sharing lots of laughter and good conversations, in the kitchen, at coffee shops and a few adventures too. I am just so blessed to be part of such a great family, my kids are the best. I have gotten to watch my granddaughter learning to walk and we have spent much time together getting to know one another…its been pretty freAking awesome!
It has been a short and sweet season of being with family and friends here, I am so thankful for those that continue to love and support me.

That season is coming quickly to a close as I enter into the beginning of my clinical training.
During my academic course my classmates and I spent much time pondering and talking about prospective internships. Just finding potential internship opportunities is somewhat daunting to say the least. For me it seemed that an overseas internship in a developing nation would be the best fit. Near the end of our course it was looking like I would be able to go to two different clinic sites and get a good portion of my clinical requirements met. Although, I will have more clinical training to do upon my return and do not yet know if I will do that stateside or go back overseas again to finish. Some of the determining factors for finishing my clinical work will depend on what options open up for me, and also financially, what kind of resources I will have at that time to house and feed myself while completing my training.

As of this week I have started finalizing the first of my clinical internships. I will be leaving Feb 7th for a 5 week internship with Mercy In Action in Olongapo, Philippines. This is who I did my academic session with and I am very excited to be able to go and train under Vicki Penwell the founder of the school, along with my instructors Ian and Rose Penwell from the fall academic session and the staff midwives in the Philippines. Although this is a relatively short internship I hope to get a good start on my clinical training. Vicki and her crew have been taking care of mothers and babies for many years in the Philippines, there is much for me to glean from them regarding midwifery care both in general terms and in developing countries. I feel as though I am being trained under one of the great midwives of our day.

http://www.MERCYINACTION.com/

https://www.facebook.com/MercyInAction

I will return from the Philippines to the U.S. for about 2-3 weeks at the end of March, then leave for Haiti around the second week of April, (I have not yet finalized my itinerary for this portion). This will be a 3 month internship at Mama Baby Haiti in Carrefour Morne Rouge, Haiti. I am equally excited for this opportunity as well, it is a busy birth center and I expect to learn and experience much during my time there. I understand it is common for naturopathic doctors to volunteer there as well. I am hoping to couple my midwifery training with some practical knowledge in natural medicine while I am there, something I have been interested in for many years.

http://www.mamababyhaiti.org/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/MamaBaby-Haiti/108573992531779?ref=ts

This may seem like quite a neat little package I’ve got tied up or am in the process of tying up. But I assure you, there is much yet to be done and I am in need of help with it.
The expense of travel and fees for both centers is far from pocket change. Also, the center in Haiti is quite young and not yet fully stocked with equipment and supplies they request I have my own birth kit and bring as many supply items as I can. This also is no small task….So I am asking for anyone reading this to consider partnering with me. You would not just be helping me personally but also those women and children I am going to be serving in the Philippines, Haiti and beyond.

The fees for Mercy in Action is $3,000, Mama Baby Haiti is $4,500; with estimated airfare, food, other personal/misc and monthly expenses, in country transportation fees etc. those combined with internship fees total to approximately $12,000.00.

I am able to receive tax-deductible donations as well as non-tax deductible donations. Tax deductible donations can be made online at the link, just click the donate button and put my name in the memo box and it will get to me.

Below is the list that Mama Baby Haiti asks midwives and students to bring in their personal birth kit. This is a pretty big list, the cost of the items range from a few dollars to over $500.

If you would like to help with a specific need or item and want to know the cost please contact me directly.

  • Birth Bag
  • Doppler with batteries
  • Fetoscope
  • BP cuff and stethoscope
  • Watch with second hand
  • Head lamp (a must)
  • A small lantern for night births
  • Tape measure and wheel
  • Instruments for cord care and suturing
  • Cord clamp for each day you are here
  • Delee and clean bulb syringe
  • Box alcohol wipes
  • Pocket guide to pregnancy (Childbirth Graphics for you bag if you would like)
  • Thermometer-digital
  • Baby sling and scale – we have some but might want in your bag
  • Box non-sterile gloves for each week here
  • 5 Pair sterile gloves for each day here
  • Small hand sanitizer container – you can fill here
  • One box baby wipes
  • Three water proof WASHABLE underpads
  • Urinalysis sticks- one bottle
  • Method for testing hgb and glucose

Campana: June 2011

I am happy to report the following:

  1. I have successfully made it to the west coast, (still praying that my belongings make it, hopefully by the end of the week).
  2. I have seen my two sons, daughter-in-law and granddaughter, all of which make my heart smile, reaLLy biG!
  3. I have officially come under the mission umbrella of CMM http://www.cmmissions.net/. I will have a bio page on the site in the upcoming weeks. This is such a blessing they are partnered with Morningstar Ministries and will be a great resource and spiritual covering for me.

So, for those of you wondering more specifically whats happening here goes. I am in the Seattle area for the summer and spending time with my family and close friends that are here.

I believe this is a time of preparation for me for the upcoming academic and clinical seasons. I mean 18 months of academics crammed into 3 months is no small deal, that is a lot of school in a short time and then the clinical portion to soon follow…So I am reading, a lot, to get back into the swing of reading, retaining and comprehending that information.

I am also fundraising for the next season that will include my clinical portion of education/training. So if the churches or organizations you are affiliated with are looking for something/someone to sow into I would be more than happy to welcome the help (it can be tax deductible also). Along with traditional fund raising I am looking for part-time work here in the Seattle area; looking into possibly having a showwith my artwork and Iʼm looking at a couple other ways to earn money.

Another aspect of my lifestyle is to spend much time in intercessory prayer. As some of you know one of the things I was involved with while in the Charlotte area was a house of prayer, harp and bowl worship. I also had the opportunity to be in fellowship with the leaders who were starting a prayer furnace while in Wilmington, which is now open. If you don’t know what I’m talking about well, check out these sites…

http://www.ihop.org/Publisher/Article.aspx?ID=1000058181
http://wilmingtonprayerfurnace.org
http://www.theprayerfurnace.org

The first link is to the live streaming page so you can see what harp and bowl worship looks like and
experience it for yourself. The second is the Wilmington Prayer Furnace, I highly recommend visiting
there if you live in Wilmington.

The last one is the Fredericksburg Prayer Furnace, where Leisha, my daughter, was last year for an
internship and has just moved back up there. She is also living a missional life, so if any of you want to help support her up there, by all means please do!
Houses of prayer staff are intercessory missionaries functioning in a variety of roles. They are not paid a salary so they raise their own support. They are missionaries in every way and the work they do is
intense and much needed. They are making a difference in the world. It is also biblical..for a quick history of 24/7 harp and bowl go to the link below, there are many examples throughout history..

http://internationalhouseofprayernorthwest.org/lang/en/res/a-brief-history-of-247-prayer/

You may be wondering why I am telling you about 24/7 houses of prayer, harp and bowl worship….what does it have to do with me becoming a midwife or going back to Thai/Burma and wherever else the Lord may take me? Simply this, it is at the very core of who I am, to worship and pray that is..and that is expressed in different ways for me on different occasions; My desire is to sit at the Lordʼs feet, to know Him and be known by Him; to cry out for justice for the innocent, to call out to heaven that it may invade earth, to see the sick healed, the captives set free, and yes, even the dead raised…that the sons and daughters of God would KNOW HIM. It is in the atmosphere of intimacy that I am able to hear the Lord most clearly, the place where personal history with the Lord takes place, thats where I want to be.

I desire to keep the fire on my hearts altar burning and to share this way of life with those around me, to encourage them to do the same. I pray this for each one of you reading this, that your hearts would be ignited by Him and you would burn for the Lord all of your days…..

Blessings to you all

Suzie

If you would like to see my proposal that has the detailed information regarding my studies, the plan to go overseas and proposed budget please let me know. I would be happy to email it to you.

If you have a preference on whether to receive my updates or not and if you prefer FB or email or both….

If you are interested in supporting me financially with a tax – deductible donations

make checks payable to (attach my name on a separate piece of paper)
CMM
PO BOX 7705
Charlotte NC 28241